GC Expectations When Submitting Bids

I had the pleasure of sitting down with a handful of local GC's and having a conversation with them about what their expectations are for subcontractors submitting bids. Instead of hoarding all this information to myself, I want to share it with all of you!


CF Estimates & Consulting is all about community growth! I started CF Estimates & Consulting to help the community grow and to help local businesses thrive, especially after such a hard year! We value respect, communication, and family above all else. These same family values are at the forefront of the business. When you become a client or employee of CF Estimates & Consulting, you become part of the CF Estimates family! Caring for our community, clients, and employees is our main goal!



General Overview

The first thing a GC looks at when you submit a bid is the NUMBERS! A GC already knows the ballpark of what a bid should be in. Once the GC has their top bids, then they read through the proposal. The ones who have submitted all the extra requirements and information ahead of time, which saves them a lot of time and energy, are the ones who get looked at first.


Be sure to COMMUNICATE with the GC! Along with having the right numbers, communication is key. Communicate before and after the following:

  • Once you receive a request to bid. It's important to establish a relationship with the GC. Reach out and introduce yourself and your company.

  • When submitting the bid proposal.

  • Follow up on the bid proposal submission.

  • Requesting feedback.


Vendor Qualification and Expectations

These are the qualifications and expectations that GC’s are looking for in contractors and will award their bids to. They may not all seem significant, but they are and should be taken seriously

  • HUB Certification

  • The level of your general liability insurance - be sure to check with the GC or PM what level of general liability insurance is needed for the job ASAP! This will make or break your bid. If you need to switch carriers for your insurance, I have a great contact for that!

  • Your average job volume - this lets the GC know if you have the experience, crew size, and ability to take on the project you are bidding for them.

  • Staff size, including your support staff - the GC want’s to make sure you are staffed properly in ALL departments of your business to make sure that on your end, the project is going to run properly and keep moving. This includes office staff. The GC wants to make sure that nothing is overlooked or going to cause the project to slow down, including anything pertaining to financials and paperwork.


Determining Factors From the GC of How They Determine Who is Awarded the Jobs

Here are the following factors that GC’s look at to determine what contractor is going to be awarded the job:

  • Pricing

  • Support Staff

  • Timeliness

  • Completeness of Scope

  • You reached out ahead of time and didn’t wait for the bid to come to you.

  • When submitting your bid, you have provided all your contact information.

  • You're responsive! You are on top of communication and respond quickly.

  • Your quality of work and experience.

  • Do you have your HUB Certification?

  • Have you worked with other contractors on this project in the past? If so, the GC likes to know this, especially if it has been on multiple projects and it's a good working relationship.

After they have gone through the above checklist, they will also do research on their top contractors and look at company reviews. However, the less research they need to do, the better. Providing a snapshot of the above information in the proper formatting will put you in the lead. YES!!! Proper formatting does matter to the GC’s.


General feedback From the GC's, Recommendations, & Communication

The GC’s are always willing to give feedback, but due to the volume of bid proposals, it is up to YOU to request that feedback. Most GC’s will never share pricing (that's confidential), but they are more than willing to tell you the areas on which you could improve.


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